I need to be able to watch POWER on STARZ….LBVS I pay $255.00 to ATT a bundle deal, too much, for a land line I don’t use, cable channels I don’t watch and the internet. I need the internet to connect to other options…right??? They don’t seem to appreciate your membership. They don’t offer suggestions, advice and/or options. You tell what your need, they let you do all the talking. It’s like they are not interesting in keeping you as a valued customer. IJS
I would love to cut the cord! I have direct tv and att bundled and pay almost $500/month! 6 cell phones and 6 dtv boxes with hd channels, but still only use a basic package i.e. no sports packages or movie channel packages, is almost stupid anymore and dtv keeps raising prices for what I already have (no upgrades). I only bundled the two to get unlimited data at a little better rate because with 4 kids we were burning through the limited data plan we had in about two weeks each month and I got tired of turning off the kids data plans each month until the next billing cycle. Anyway, my only hang up is that I love college sports (football, basketball, baseball, etc…) and I’m not sure if I can get sports channels on one of the options you listed. I live for bowl games and march madness!! Any idea if any internet streaming services offer an sports packages?
For vast libraries of movies and TV content prior to the current season, I recommend getting the 30-day free trial to Amazon Prime. Another big reason to get Amazon Prime is the option of adding Showtime and Starz with your subscription. For just $8.99 per month, you have every TV show and movie offered by Starz and Showtime just as if you had the network with a cable provider.
Local stations often have their own transmitters, which means that there’s a good chance that your favorite local station is available for free over the air. Over-the-air TV may seem old-school, but there’s nothing old-fashioned about the crisp HD streams that are the hallmark of modern OTA TV. The right antenna will get you HD feeds of local networks, including local affiliates of the four major networks (ABC, CBS, Fox, and NBC), plus PBS and other local stations. An antenna is all you need to watch everything from NFL football to the local news.

There is overlap, but streaming these during non-peak periods works very well if you have a good broadband connection. My work pays for a low-tier Cable business connection. No limits on the bandwidth this way, but if a home was normal and streamed 1 HiDef 2 hr movie every day of the month, the entire home should be under 250GB of use – no bandwidth cap issue for most DSL and Cable ISP connections in the USA. Forget this if you have cell data. It is too slow for hidef content. 

i use justin.tv as well as steam2watch.com for all my sporting events.felt the same way as others about dropping cable PRIOR to finding these sites. no brainer after that. also have free wi fi internet through open unsecured routers in the neighborhood. secure it on my end with an old linksys router(wrt54g) and free software from dd-wrt.com.you can pick these up cheap on ebay or craigslist( mine cost me a whole 15 bucks!).

In the past year or so, streaming services like Hulu with Live TV and YouTube TV have started to include local network programming in some markets. My market in upstate New York doesn't include CBS, sadly, but others are. You can check the lists here for Hulu, here for YouTube TV, and here for Dish. PlayStation Vue offer various live TV options depending on your location.


Many services offer on-demand shows from the big four majors, often with a day or two delay, even if the live network affiliate isn't available. But that doesn't help much if you want to watch the local news or live sports, such as football. (Many local stations throughout the country also offer apps on Roku and other devices that deliver live or tape-delayed on-demand versions of just the local news, too.)
My take is that they are focused on the areas that get NO cable service because they know it’s a slam dunk so they charge rates that are more expensive for what they offer because they can. It’s like this, if they want my business, they have to have the same TV channels for less and they are so far from it. Also, if they do undercut any pricing, it’s marginal because they are trying to maximize their profits exponentially. Take a look at the free trials they all offer. They’re almost all the same: 1 week, or maybe 5 days, and then the monthly rate kicks in. What a joke. They’re greedy.
Peter i need the book ” for dummies” about all that you are teaching. I pay 170.00 a month for basically nothing from comcast. I really want to tell them to go to hell for years now. Need help on step by step on what i need to get, do and understand the easy for dummy way. If you can help with one on one teaching me well i rather give you the payment i give freaking comcast. I HATE EVERYTHING ABOUT THEM, EVERYTHING. PLEASE HELP. KAREN

The general rule for digital antennas is the higher, the better. Structures such as floors, cabinets, and walls may impact TV signal reception, so placing your antenna high in a window is ideal, as long as it's free from exterior obstructions (trees, buildings, billboards, and so on). Indoor antennas should not be installed behind a TV or electronic equipment, next to metal objects, or near high-traffic areas, as TV signal reception may be impacted.
I take it you have done your homework and it sounds as though you know your stuff! However, I do not know who you are or if you are a “plant” by the cable industry to down talk these alternative methods to cable. Having said that, I need to do my own research and I know I have to start somewhere, so I consider your remarks and opinions as that start. The problem I see in doing research is “who to trust”! Call me cynical if you wish. However, I detest these things about cable: 1) The major cable companies (Comcast, Spectrum, et al) control the perimeters of choice for consumers by, as you stated, “blocking” given areas; 2) If you want to watch a given number of channels, the cable companies mentioned control the “plans” for the channels that include my favorites like sports, local channels, documentaries, etc… I could not care less for the so-called movie channels that show hardly anything but smut movies. I have to pay an astronomical monthly fee to get the preferred channels and pay for channels I do not want or watch. I suppose I could list much more disgust that I have for cable. However, all I would be doing is frustrating myself more. The task of searching for the best solution is to me, much too tedious and not as trustworthy as is being touted by these “cable cutting” enterprises. So, until I can find a more realistic alternative, I will stay with the blood-sucking cable company which I currently have.
The wild world of standalone apps: Your local news station may offer its own app for streaming devices, but not all of these apps have live feeds, and the quality of each app can vary by area, network, and station owner. I recommend searching your device's app store for the name of your nearest city or the call signs of your local stations to see what's available.

Hulu with Live TV’s local TV coverage largely depends on where you live in the country. In Los Angeles, CA they offer nine local channels, while Nampa, ID can pick up four, and Chattanooga, TN can get five. Of course, those Chattanoogans will be out NBC, while FOX and CBS are available. It’s confusing exactly why some channels are available in some places, but not others. However, you don’t need to go in blind. Hulu has a local channel search page that allows you to put in your zip code and see what local options you’ve got. Along with local channels, Hulu with Live TV offers a complete Hulu membership and 50+ live cable channels for just $40 per month. If you’re already a Hulu fan, this is a great way to get local channels, cable news, and Hulu all under one bill a month.
I cut the cord about 12 years ago and have never looked back! Live in Western Massachusetts. I have over-the-air-waves TVs after the one-time cost of antennas, of course. I only get 6 channels. The four PBS channels, ABC & FOX, because of where I live, lowland, 1st fl. rental so can’t get my antennas anywhere up high enough. Friends w/same set up who live in a higher elevation get over 20 channels.

Not only do you have access to stream over 40,000 hit movies and TV shows, but you get free music, books, and unlimited photo storage as well. Your membership also includes free 2-day shipping from Amazon.com regardless of the order size. Some metropolitan areas offer 2-hour shipping. For more information, check out all the benefits you receive with Amazon Prime.
We just started using PlayStation Vue. So far we really like it. I looked into Sling TV when we were getting ready to cut the cord, but then I came across PlayStation Vue and it had more channels and more of the channels we as a family wanted. My husband gets a ton of his sports channels, including the Golf channel and we still get Disney Jr. for our son. We also have Netflix and a HD antenna for local channels. PlayStation Vue was only $5 more a month so it was worth it for us. We access it through the Amazon Fire stick.
That said, streams will be out there. Sites from other countries often aren’t subjected to rigorous copyright policing, and the sheer volume of live streaming can make it difficult for big providers like Facebook and Periscope to patrol. Chances are, if you dig around on the hashtags or sketchy subreddits, you’ll find someone pointing their camera phone at the game for your amusement.
John-Michael Bond is a tech reporter and culture writer for Daily Dot. A longtime cord-cutter and early adapter, he's an expert on streaming services (Hulu with Live TV), devices (Roku, Amazon Fire), and anime. A former staff writer for TUAW, he's knowledgeable on all things Apple and Android. You can also also find him regularly performing standup comedy in Los Angeles.
If you just want local channels you could just get a TV with a digital tuner (most of them these days), and use a HDTV antenna to get all your local channels. To record live shows you can use a over-the-air DVR like the Tablo TV DVR. If there are premium channels you want beyond the basics there are services that carry those channels like Sling TV, Amazon, HBO GO, and more. It all comes down to figuring out what channels and services you need, and figuring out where they’re available.
However, please note that I'm not advocating doing ALL of these! If you did, you'd wind up spending more than you were paying for cable. That would be dumb. We currently subscribe to Sling TV, Netflix, and Amazon Prime.  We are switching over to DIRECTV NOW starting next month because we have one AT&T phone and can use the data from that phone to watch for free.
First, find out what you can watch free on local broadcast TV. At www.antennaweb.org, enter your address and other information about your home to see the stations you can likely receive and the kind of antenna you need to access them. You may be able to find an outdoor antenna for $30 to $150, depending on the type; indoor antennas cost $40 or less, but reception may not be as good.
I don’t follow your second point, what seems unethical – and difficult? If you mean Playon – I’m not sure why it would be unethical. You still have to watch all the ads that Hulu/other services put in the content, as watching TV through playon is basically the same as watching it through your web browser. So you’re not really stealing content or anything like that. Just watching it with Playon instead of IE or Firefox.
That does sound like a good idea. Great review again! I may opt for that instead of say the apple tv, since the projector is made already to mirror my laptop screen. I would be getting the best of both worlds for a fraction of the price. I could actually get by just keeping the laptop connected and mirror the screen for anything online. With that in mind, I’m curious to know if there exists wireless speakers that I can set up across the room which can stream audio coming from the laptop. Would there be a delay?
You might be able to quit cable completely, moving to a mixture of streaming services and paid downloads. Or you might be able to reduce your monthly fees by replacing expensive rental equipment with a streaming box and free apps. Alternatively, you could stick with cable or satellite but spend less by figuring out what you really need. It’s easier than ever to watch the content you want without being stuck in an expensive, long-term contract.
There is also this thing called broadcast television, which anyone can watch as long as they have a TV that supports digital television (or a digital conversion box) and an over-the-air (OTA) HDTV antenna. The thing about broadcast television is that I couldn't watch it on Apple TV. I'd have to switch my TV input over, and then flip through the channels until I found something to watch. I rarely watched broadcast television because I tend to stick with Apple TV for my TV and movie watching activities.
It kind of depends on what you’re using to watch Playon? Are you using a game console like xbox 360? If so, you’ll need to get a wireless router that is connected to your PC in some way to transmit to the xbox 360 – which will also need to have a usb wireless adapter (unless it is one of the new Xbox units that has wireless built in). Otherwise, if you buy one of the new TVs that have a media player built in that can play streaming media, you’ll just need to make sure it has wireless built in as well. I guess it really depends on what setup you’ll be using – and what you’ll be using to play the streaming media.
Every cable-replacement service has strengths and weaknesses. This list is presented in order from the strongest overall (PlayStation Vue) to the weakest (DirecTV Now). While your preference among services may depend on what you want to watch, which programs you want to record and how much you're willing to pay, this guide should help you decide what's worth your money.
The first thing to do is think about your TV watching habits. Do you have any specific “must see” shows? Write down the name of the show, and the network it is on. Do you watch a lot of sports. If so, see if there is a season pass you can buy for the Internet (you can stream these on many newer TV sets). Write down your TV watching habits – are you a channel surfer, do you TIVO or record everything, etc. Your responses will give you a good idea of whether or not you can drop your cable TV subscription.
The service that started the cable-replacement trend is still one of the best on the market. Sling TV starts off cheap ($20 per month), and while the cost can balloon quickly, depending on your add-ons, this probably won't happen. That's because Sling TV offers two basic packages of channels (Orange and Blue), then lets viewers pick and choose smaller add-ons, which usually cost $5 per month. From sports to comedy to kids' programming to foreign language channels, Sling TV has a little something for everyone. The service's DVR features are not bad, either.
CBS News: Not to be confused with CBS's nightly and weekly broadcasts, this round-the-clock streaming service provides anchored news coverage throughout the day and live broadcasts of major events. In a sense, it's an antidote to cable news, with a heavy emphasis on reported stories instead of talking heads. For cord cutters, it's a must-see. Available on: Roku, Amazon Fire TV, Apple TV, Android TV, and Xbox

UPDATE: Due to their legal battle, VidAngel has a NEW streaming service. You can read all the details in my post about VidAngel being back, but basically, you can connect your Netflix, Amazon Prime, and HBO accounts and for $7.99 a month, you can filter content. It’s VERY awesome and exciting that they are offering this. You can get a 30 Day Free Trial here.

At first I used an antenna, Netflix, Hulu and other internet websites for alternatives to catch all of my favorite shows. Last summer something magical happened after the TV seasons ended, I stopped subscribing to Netflix, and I quit watching TV. Today I probably average about 1-2 hours per week of TV watching. I don’t miss it at all, and I am still really busy. So now, I’m not only saving money, but I am saving time. It really is a win-win situation when you cut TV out of your life.

You’d be surprised Vicki, many can’t part with either for some reason. That said, taking a look at that site there are very few series available on it so it wouldn’t be a good option for many. I’d also disagree that you can get most of what you want to watch online. For many they’ll want or need a streaming services to replace the channels/shows they watch most.
Depending on which sports and teams interest you, you may be able to catch games you want to see free. Fan of the home team? Local broadcast TV may carry most of the games, depending on whether blackout policies prohibit coverage in local markets. (The National Football League, for example, doesn’t allow games to be broadcast locally unless they sell out.)
I’ve been wanting to get some sort of satellite dish put on our home for television for a while, but I wanted to do some reading before we chose anything. I’m glad you talked about how pricing can be complicated, so I think that’s something I’ll have to be sure to ask about. I’m going to have to look for a good dish provider and see what we can find!

This may not be for everyone, but if are in the US, and you already have a somewhat fast PC with a large enough hard drive, a home network, and an Xbox 360 on a TV, you can get an HD TV card with 2 tuners and record up to two TV programs at a time. I am using an HDHomerun, because I like the fact that it’s not physically in my computer, but there are cheaper alternatives. The Windows7 version of Windows Media Center has greater HD quality than most HD recorders offered by cable/satellite/ and others that cost over $400.00 per box if you were to buy one! Some cable companies deliver QAM signals also, so even if you only have the most basic cable signal, you may be getting free unencrypted digital signals over that line (check with your cable company), or you can also use an antenna for free, like me.
This is by no means a comprehensive list of alternatives to cable, but it’s a great mix-and-match way to get started. And you can usually get a free trial of almost any of these before you commit. If you’re not quite ready to give up your favorite sports or movie channels, you can always call your cable or satellite provider and try to negotiate a better deal. Knowing your options will usually work to your advantage!
Many services offer on-demand shows from the big four majors, often with a day or two delay, even if the live network affiliate isn't available. But that doesn't help much if you want to watch the local news or live sports, such as football. (Many local stations throughout the country also offer apps on Roku and other devices that deliver live or tape-delayed on-demand versions of just the local news, too.)
According to Twitter, the 2017 Super Bowl spawned many a tweet. If you don’t care about the game, but you want to stay current with all the new memes it will spawn, you can abandon watching the broadcast completely and just read the social media posts. Monday will also bring with it a huge torrent of recap and wrap-up stories to get you ready for those water cooler conversations, even if you spent Sunday night training for Ninja Warrior or knitting a scarf or whatever.
Similar to the HBO service but $4/month cheaper, Showtime lets you stream all of their content using Roku, Android, Apple TV or an Amazon TV device. You can also get a $3/month discount on their service if you subscribe through Hulu and you can also pay full price to get access through Playstation Vue TV. However, if you’re a Playstation Plus member you can add it for $8.99.
ESPN3.com streams live broadcasts of professional baseball, basketball, soccer, golf and tennis, as well as college football and basketball. You can stream ESPN3.com content to an Xbox 360 gaming console and watch it on your TV, but you must have an Xbox Live Gold membership, which is $9.99 per month or $59.99 per year. (Ditto for streaming Netflix content to your TV with the Xbox 360.)
WOW you get all that for $157 per month. I should be so lucky. We are paying $328 per month and are livid. Although we do rent 2 DVRs and have HBO, MAX. SHOW and STARZ . This cable company is horrible and its only competition is satellite and the internet options Kayla has explained. On top of that we live 50 miles south of DC and an antenna up to 20 feet high gets us poor reception on 3 channels with a quality hdtv antenna. I mam checking into these alternatives but the hard part is getting our favorite channels.
You don’t need a cable subscription for everything, but lately I’ve noticed they are blacking out more and more marquee events on ESPN3. I would have cut the cord long ago if it wasn’t for my love of sports. There are illegal streams for most sporting events now, but if you want to go legit you don’t have many options. You could do MLB.tv and things like that, but once you factor in those costs plus going out to bars or friends’ places for NFL games, etc. it’s getting almost as expensive as a cable plan.
Digital antennas are awesome. You can get an inexpensive digital antenna at any electronics store for less than $40. Here is the cool thing about digital TV – you get a perfect signal, or you get nothing. You don’t have to deal with the fuzzy picture and static sounds of yesterday’s rabbit ears. The best part is that many TV stations now broadcast in HD. So you can get HD quality television over the air – which believe it or not, is often better quality than what you would get through a cable TV connection because of signal degradation and compression.
On the other hand, these services have clear drawbacks compared with cable. The first is that your ability to record programs or stream them later can vary from channel to channel. For example, Sling TV lets you watch content from up to seven days in the past on many channels, but ESPN and some other channels don’t allow you to rewind at all. And certain channels on Sling TV, including ESPN, allow you to stream to only one device at a time, whereas you can stream other channels to multiple devices at once. In a home with multiple users, people will likely get frustrated when their program stops because another person started to watch it in another room. Channel listings can also vary depending on your location, so you might gain or lose a local station or two if you’re using the service on the road. In addition, you don’t always get access to app streaming with any of these packages; you’ll be able to watch anything through the service’s interface, but not a network’s own app.
Another issue is the availability of the local streams for networks like the Big 4: ABC, CBS, FOX and NBC. Several reasons prevent the services from just putting local streams out there. As a result, you will find situations like in Phoenix where YouTube TV streams all four, Sling TV streams just FOX and DirecTV Now can’t stream local channels at all. You can read our review of the best services for streaming local TV for more details.

K.C. That’s a great way to save money, especially if you aren’t much of a TV watcher. I don’t personally watch much TV, but the shows my wife and I watch tend to be on cable – often the Travel Channel, Food Network, Discover, History, ESPN, and The Disney Channel for our little one. That said, I don’t think we would be heartbroken to cut the cord and go without – just as long as I can keep my fast internet connection! 😉
The biggest plan to get is $11.99, dubbed the “Premium” plan, which gives you Ultra HD and the ability to watch on 4 screens. This particular plan could be advantageous for families who want to watch a lot of different things at once, but is the extra $4/month or $48/year worth it? It all depends on your situation, but something to consider. They do offer one month free, so there is the option to test out whatever plan you want as well before finally deciding.

Finally, the larger a household gets—in other words, the more TVs you have—the more value you get out of the price of a traditional cable or satellite subscription, because the same package works for a single person or a family of five. Many streaming services support only a single stream at once, making them appealing for a small household but impractical for a household with multiple viewers. (With cable or satellite, you may need to pay for additional set-top boxes, but that’s an incremental cost compared with the overall package.)
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YouTube is known for hosting thousands of viral videos. But it’s also a great place to learn. In the span of a few minutes, you can discover everything from how to fold a fitted sheet to how to make delicious dishes that won’t bust the budget. You can even watch many classic shows and movies there too! Are indie films and documentaries more your thing? Check out Vimeo.
I get that some people are super into sports. I totally respect that everyone has the right to their own likes and tastes. Personally I have zero interest in any sport that I or someone I care about is not directly participating in, but I am super into a few things that cost money. Mountain biking, for example. What blows me away is that many people who are into sports can read the above article, blow right past the $1,000,000 lifetime price tag on cable TV and still say “nope, I gotta have my college football / basketball / March Madness / NBA package / whatever. If mountain biking carried a lifetime cost of that magnitude, I would find something else to love as soon as I could sell my bike to the next sucker who came along. It really is that simple. In fact, that’s reason #1 I’m into mountain biking and not sport aviation.
It’s too bad I live in Boon F—– Missouri, the speed I get here gives me yesterdays programs when it works,(seriously) I have what is called Century Tell (extended service) That of course mean’s I’m one step ahead of Fred Flintstone in the tech-world. It sucks to live just 13 miles out in the rural area and have to suck hind tit with no advantages! Our netflix speed is too slow to even stream any shows! I guess we’ll have to sell to the Clampits and move to a modern part of the world, think I’ll tear down the outhouse tomorrow and start building that inside bathroom everybody talks about! (just jokin) Any solutions for me???
There are commercials and advertising. You can interact with the commercials so they focus more on your interests, so at the very least they are semi-interesting. And, if you are lucky, you can watch one long commercial at the beginning to have an interruption-free viewing. However, they recently starting offering a commercial-free package, which is awesome. 
Networked Media Device – Like Our Xbox 360:  You can get a brand new Xbox 360 for around $100-150 nowadays, sometimes cheaper.  We just got our second one for $75 from a friend. Tons of other networked media devices are compatible as well including Ipad, Iphone, Google Chromecast,  Playstation 4, HP Mediasmart TVs, and Nintendo Wii and Roku devices. Check the link above to see if your device is supported. –  Cost:  Free-$200 (depends on if you have one of these already. If you don't have one already, I recommend the uber-cheap $35 Google Chromecast or Fire TV)
Once you have a TV that is “digital ready”, all you need to do is install a TV antenna. I installed the Mohu Sky 60 outdoor antenna on my roof and now I receive all the major local broadcast networks. Mohu also makes quality indoor antennas like The Mohu Curve and Mohu Leaf. If you are interested in purchasing a Mohu antenna, check my Mohu promo page for a big discount.

PlayStation Vue: With the $30-per-month Access Slim plan, you get CNN, Fox News, MSNBC, HLN, Fox Business, and CNBC. In some markets where local broadcast feeds are available, that price jumps to $40 per month for the Access plan. BBC World News requires an Elite plan for $15 per month more. Available on: Roku, Amazon Fire TV, Apple TV, Android TV, Chromecast, and PlayStation consoles

One approach is to use one of the cord-cutting “calculators” at sites like The Verge and Slate, which allow users to pick out which services they’re interested in and then tally up your savings relative to cable. These are useful, but they generally don’t take into account a key cord cutting enabler: the ability to purchase shows a la carte through iTunes and Amazon, usually within a day of their original airing. This isn’t new technology—iTunes has been selling television downloads since 2005—but it changes the streaming calculus because it means you can easily and cheaply plug any gaps in whatever bundle of streaming options you choose.
Something to keep in mind is that not all of these alternative will have the latest and greatest shows. So, if you want to avoid spoilers and keep up with your friends who have still have cable, you’ll want to get something like Hulu that offers new shows right after they air on cable vs Netflix, where you have to wait until the entire season is over and that’s if they acquire the rights to the show.
Hi Peter, I’m sorry to sound so ignorant, but I have no Internet service, cable or satellite t.v. We do have a xbox. Is there a way to watch t.v. through our xbox? Please tell me if there is. We are so tired of watching our same DVD’S over and over. My son’s are nine and eleven, so they get really tired of the DVD’S. Could you please send me an email? Thank you so much!
Pluto TV: Pluto turns online video sources into cable-like channels that you can flip through, and many of those sources cover the news. Install this app, and you can tune into round-the-clock feeds from NBC, CNBC, TYT Network, NewsmaxTV, Newsy, RT America, Sky News, Bloomberg, and Cheddar. Available on: Roku, Amazon Fire TV, Android TV, Apple TV, and Chromecast
I’ll keep my eyes peeled on you guys and your progress, and try to follow your lead! By the way you have all been most informative,and Peter, thanks for starting the subject you truly have helped my frame of mind. I know I threw in a bit of southern humor to keep you all entertained but buy God I am going to overcome this so-called generational gap and get in there with you all. I won’t be a tech. but perhaps I’ll learn how to better utilize my equipment…
As far as watching shows when they air, if it’s a show on one of the cable networks you may or may not get the show a day or two after it airs on a service like Hulu. Otherwise you might need to pay for that particular show on a service like Amazon – which in many cases is still cheaper than paying for cable. Or in some cases you can watch live shows on a service like Sling TV.
I am 81 years old. Am tired of paying $66.98 per month for cable.. also pay $51.99 per mo. for internet… and the e-mail has been down for 3 days now. I am in the Atlanta metro area. there is no way I could understand or know how to do what you have. Is there any business in this area that you know of that could set me up. A one time fee would be worth it … my main recreation is the TV and computer. Hopefully Charter will have e-mail fixed so I can receive and send soon. I appreciate any help you can point me to. Thank you.
Playstation Vue is a relatively new TV option and lesser known service on the radar of cord-cutters, even though it’s offered by Sony. And along with Sling TV, they very well may have the most transparent pricing and sign-up process. The Playstation Vue channel lineup also includes 50+ channels in their base package dubbed “Access Slim” for $29.99 / month (this used to be $50 and they dropped the price).

You’d be surprised Vicki, many can’t part with either for some reason. That said, taking a look at that site there are very few series available on it so it wouldn’t be a good option for many. I’d also disagree that you can get most of what you want to watch online. For many they’ll want or need a streaming services to replace the channels/shows they watch most.
You might be able to quit cable completely, moving to a mixture of streaming services and paid downloads. Or you might be able to reduce your monthly fees by replacing expensive rental equipment with a streaming box and free apps. Alternatively, you could stick with cable or satellite but spend less by figuring out what you really need. It’s easier than ever to watch the content you want without being stuck in an expensive, long-term contract.
If you want—or need—to see a significant number of your local teams’ games, I’m going to stop right here. This is one area where streaming services can’t yet fully deliver. Local games are generally exclusive to regional sports networks, and you’ll still need cable for that. There’s also the issue of some online services being a little more unstable than die-hard fans might like. Dish’s Sling TV failed for many customers during this weekend’s NCAA Final Four action, leading the company to issue an apology.
Of course, there’s never a bad time to reexamine your cable package and determine if you still need the one you’re on. Perhaps when you signed up, your provider gave you a premium package at a low rate, but that rate has expired and you’re now paying the regular price—do you really need those premium channels? Similarly, as nice as having 200-plus channels at your fingertips can be, many people spend the majority of their TV time watching just a few select stations. See if your provider offers a less expensive package that has the stations you want.
Channel Master's SMARTenna+ is the industry's leading indoor TV antenna. The SMARTenna+ features a sleek, modern design that can fit effortlessly into your home. The antenna houses seven “virtual” antennas inside to provide you with a maximum signal range. It also features both automated and by the button scanning so you will always be in control of your antenna. Did we mention the SMARTenna+ has been called the world's smartest indoor TV antenna? And it is for good reason. The SMARTenna+ features Active Steering Technology which enables virtual antenna steering, giving you the maximum number of channels available and the best reception quality.
Why not hook your TV to an antenna and get many HD channels for free. All local broadcasters CBS, ABC, NBC, PBS, FOX broadcast free over the air HD programs. That is zero monthly bill and zero is good. For sports and other program the internet is full of resources that offer most programming for free or a small fee such as Netflix and Hulu that you mentioned above. Why not suggest these to our readers?
So why recommend an HTPC over a set-top box? Full keyboard/mouse lets you actually use the device as a computer, allowing you to type and navigate comfortably. You can play games on it (a PC has always been a better gaming device than consoles, for my money). You can view Hulu on it without paying for Hulu+ (which, in addition to unlocking certain content and providing HD streams, allows you to view Hulu content on mobile and set-top devices). Bringing full computer functionality to your big screen is a big win.
Hi, We have been considering giving up our Directv for sometime, Running across this forum has made the decision for us. I see that a Chromecast would be needed per TV that you want to use. My question is, Does a laptop or computer HAVE to be used to do any of this? We have a PS3, So would I be able to use the PS3 for Hulu, Netflix, Playon, and whatever other channels we find? And the other question is, On any of these options, can you watch the show/movie live or do you have to wait a week or so after it airs? We are more worried about our shows like Outlander, Game of Thrones, Big Bang theory, Homeland, etc??
ESPN3.com streams live broadcasts of professional baseball, basketball, soccer, golf and tennis, as well as college football and basketball. You can stream ESPN3.com content to an Xbox 360 gaming console and watch it on your TV, but you must have an Xbox Live Gold membership, which is $9.99 per month or $59.99 per year. (Ditto for streaming Netflix content to your TV with the Xbox 360.)
DIRECTV NOW was DIRECTV’s way of keeping its satellite TV service available for users who don’t want a dish installed or multi-year contracts. You can use the Just Right package and add HBO (Game of Thrones and Westworld for only $5 more per month instead of $15? Yeah, we’re in). Consider also that you can get your favorite networks like HGTV, Sundance TV, and the Travel Channel. Plus, you can also record up to 20 hours of TV to hold onto for 30 days with the included cloud DVR.

PlayStation Vue is a streaming service similar to Sling TV, offering channels like AMC, TBS, Syfy and much more. However, this service starts at $44.99 per month. Check out this comparison of Sling TV Channels vs. PS Vue for the difference in each services channel lineup. You don’t need a PlayStation gaming console to use the service either. While the service is available on PlayStation 3 and PlayStation 4, you can also use the service with Roku, Amazon Fire TV, Fire TV Stick, Google Chromecast, Android, iPad, and iPhone. Check out my review of PlayStation Vue for more details.
Sling is the company that kickstarted the TV streaming category and still has the cheapest offering of the Big 5 (although sports-free options from Philo and AT&T Watch TV are cheaper at $16 and $15 monthly; see below). The main reason Sling can offer such low prices is it carries very few local stations (ABC, CBS, Fox and NBC), so many subscribers supplement the service with an antenna. Sling's interface isn't much to look at, but it offers all of the options you need without cluttering the screen. The only real letdown is its arcane live pause and DVR exceptions (you can't record Disney-owned channels like ABC, for example). Its options are myriad, including two base channel lineups (Orange and Blue) and numerous add-ons, so check out Sling TV: Everything you need to know for all the details.
3/22/16 UPDATE: It's been one month, and I'm still discovering little things. Quite by accident, while viewing a live channel, I pressed the pause button, which froze the picture. On hitting play, the show started from the very beginning, and I noticed "Time Shifting" appear on the screen. I haven't duplicated this, but I believe this is how you may start a live show from the beginning, should you tune in a bit late.
Channel Master's SMARTenna+ is the industry's leading indoor TV antenna. The SMARTenna+ features a sleek, modern design that can fit effortlessly into your home. The antenna houses seven “virtual” antennas inside to provide you with a maximum signal range. It also features both automated and by the button scanning so you will always be in control of your antenna. Did we mention the SMARTenna+ has been called the world's smartest indoor TV antenna? And it is for good reason. The SMARTenna+ features Active Steering Technology which enables virtual antenna steering, giving you the maximum number of channels available and the best reception quality.
If you’re old enough, the thought of using an antenna probably conjures memories of temperamental “rabbit ears” and staticky images. But today’s antennas come in a range of designs, from paper-thin indoor models like the Clearstream Flex, to Erector Set behemoths that you mount on a rooftop mast, and they provide reliable, crystal-clear HD resolution for absolutely free. All you need to do is plug one into the tuner that’s a fixture of most modern TVs.
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