I get that some people are super into sports. I totally respect that everyone has the right to their own likes and tastes. Personally I have zero interest in any sport that I or someone I care about is not directly participating in, but I am super into a few things that cost money. Mountain biking, for example. What blows me away is that many people who are into sports can read the above article, blow right past the $1,000,000 lifetime price tag on cable TV and still say “nope, I gotta have my college football / basketball / March Madness / NBA package / whatever. If mountain biking carried a lifetime cost of that magnitude, I would find something else to love as soon as I could sell my bike to the next sucker who came along. It really is that simple. In fact, that’s reason #1 I’m into mountain biking and not sport aviation.
If you just watch the basic cable channels: Sling TV is the cheapest way to get the basic cable channels online right now, and it's a very flexible service. The one weird thing is the difference between the basic Blue ($20/mo) and Orange ($25/mo) plans. Blue has ESPN and Disney, while Orange has Fox Sports 1/2, NFL Network, NBC Sports Network, and a couple other random channels. It costs $40/mo for the Blue+Orange plan, at which point the other bundles are worth considering.
The biggest plan to get is $11.99, dubbed the “Premium” plan, which gives you Ultra HD and the ability to watch on 4 screens. This particular plan could be advantageous for families who want to watch a lot of different things at once, but is the extra $4/month or $48/year worth it? It all depends on your situation, but something to consider. They do offer one month free, so there is the option to test out whatever plan you want as well before finally deciding.

The first thing you may want to consider is an HD antenna. This doesn't provide a way to watch streaming videos, but if you want to watch live TV, it's the cheapest and simplest solution. You may remember having rabbit ears on your hand-me-down TV as a kid — an HD antenna is basically the modern-day version of that. You hook the device into your TV, put it somewhere near a window and watch as the free channels roll in.

First, the best TV moved from networks to cable. Now a similar transition is moving top talent from cable to the streaming world. Netflix ($8.99 per month for HD streaming) has House of Cards, Orange Is the New Black, and Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt—all of which have received almost universal acclaim—and Amazon ($99 per year for video and a variety of other services) isn’t too far behind with comedy Alpha House, crime drama Bosch, and the Golden Globe-winning Transparent.


PlayStation Vue is the slickest of all the major streaming TV providers, with a pleasant, evolved interface that is also easy to use. Its DVR is excellent, with unlimited storage and the ability to skip commercials on any show -- although unlike YouTube TV, shows in Vue's DVR are deleted after 28 days. The biggest knock is that it's one of the most expensive basic packages (Hulu is now also $45), but it has fewer channels than any of the Big Five aside from Sling TV, and local channel coverage is less comprehensive, too. You don't need a PlayStation 4 to watch it -- just like the others, Vue has apps for numerous streaming devices including Roku, Apple TV and Fire TV as well as phones and PCs -- but a PS4 is the only way to get its sweet multiscreen view.
You’re right. Cable TV and satellite TV costs have increased over the years and it’s out of reach for people who can’t afford it. Also, if you’re busy and don’t watch too much TV it doesn’t make sense to pay more than you should for the service. However, all is not lost. There’re many good deals out there. So do your research and the math before cutting the cord.
Buy a basic digital flat digital antenna at your local electronics store. These are usually priced under $50. If you live more than 25 miles from the closest broadcast towers or if your TV is in the basement, you might need an outdoor antenna. These are more expensive but can be mounted on your roof, your balcony, or even in your attic for better reception.
An antenna is your means of access to local programming when cutting cable TV. If you want an in-depth guide for the information required for an optimal antenna solution, you should check out my antenna guide. Setting up an antenna may be seamless, or it may be the most difficult thing you do when canceling cable. There are numerous variables involved in television signals and antennas. If you are having a difficult time with this, the antenna guide makes this task easier.
I ended up cutting the cord about a little over a year ago. I watch a couple comedies (modern family, the office) before going to bed via a free app on my phone. The programming for the kids on Netflix is perfect. They usually watch that on a rainy day. I am however contemplating cutting Netflix as well since we could almost as easily use our library card to rent a couple DVDs every so often and not have “TV” so easily accessible.
Hulu with Live TV’s local TV coverage largely depends on where you live in the country. In Los Angeles, CA they offer nine local channels, while Nampa, ID can pick up four, and Chattanooga, TN can get five. Of course, those Chattanoogans will be out NBC, while FOX and CBS are available. It’s confusing exactly why some channels are available in some places, but not others. However, you don’t need to go in blind. Hulu has a local channel search page that allows you to put in your zip code and see what local options you’ve got. Along with local channels, Hulu with Live TV offers a complete Hulu membership and 50+ live cable channels for just $40 per month. If you’re already a Hulu fan, this is a great way to get local channels, cable news, and Hulu all under one bill a month.
Network websites such as FOX.com, ABC.com, and NBC.com allow you to catch their respective TV programs on the same day they air. While you won’t get to see their content live, you’re still getting a good deal considering the fact that they’re offering the service free of charge. Besides, you can always watch episodes from previous seasons while waiting for the current episode to be released on the site.
Trim is one of the neatest tools I’ve found for saving money, and it’s free. It’s a simple app that can sift through your spending habits, find subscriptions you should probably cancel and it can even negotiate your cable bill, find you better car insurance, and more. If you hate making that annual phone call to your cable company where you pretend you’re leaving (so they will cut your price), definitely give Trim a shot.
On the other hand, we found no streaming package with a sport channel lineup more comprehensive than a standard cable package as of late 2017. You also won’t find many popular regional sports networks that carry local MLB, NBA, and NHL teams. You can watch games that local teams play on ESPN and other national broadcasts, but you usually can’t watch every game through streaming-only services. (Many of these regional sports networks may end up under the ESPN umbrella as part of Disney’s planned acquisition of 21st Century Fox, but it’s still to early to say how this move will affect the streaming availability of local games for about half the teams in those three leagues.) In addition, some particular events are subject to their own licensing rules—for example, you can’t watch Monday Night Football through Sling TV on your mobile phone, because Verizon has exclusive rights to stream NFL games to phones.

Approximately 10 percent of American TV patrons have canceled cable TV to reduce household costs, and statistics show the number of people cutting the cable cord doubles every year. If you are tired of surfing through hundreds of channels and paying high subscription fees, examine your current TV usage, buy a streaming device and opt for media streaming from your TV or computer.
Whether you’re a good candidate for cutting the cord depends in large part on what and when you watch. Before considering cancelling your cable subscription, first spend some time evaluating your viewing habits. How often do you actually sit down and watch television? When you do, what are you actually watching? Live sports? Prime-time reality television? The Cooking Channel? Do you like being able to channel surf or do you usually only turn on your TV to watch Game of Thrones?
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