I can’t speak to those channels specifically as I’m not really sure. Typically though if you use PlayOn, as long as the channel is available in the software or as a plugin you’ll be able to watch shows from that network. Not all networks make online streaming available, however, so it really depends. There is a link in the article above to the PlayOn site mentioning which channels are available. 

For Linda Stuart: Depending upon where you live (elevation) or access to attic or roof for antenna, you should be able to get all the major broadcast network channels that you mentioned without cable (ABC, FOX, NBC, CBS, etc.) over-the-air-waves for FREE with a good antenna. Your local sports might be available on those stations or other local stations that you might be able to access. The major sports channels that are on cable could be premium and not readily available anywhere but on paid cable. (Like ESPN?) I don’t watch sports so I don’t know. Ask your cable company if they offer a minimal basic rate, really inexpensive, to only get a those few major sports channels. I doubt it because that is their BIG draw for cable to the many in our culture who are sports oriented. Good luck!
I’ve been wanting to get some sort of satellite dish put on our home for television for a while, but I wanted to do some reading before we chose anything. I’m glad you talked about how pricing can be complicated, so I think that’s something I’ll have to be sure to ask about. I’m going to have to look for a good dish provider and see what we can find!
I have Comcast for internet but included the basic TV package since our OTA antenna does not pick up all local stations well in our area. PBS does not come in at all. Playon is a great addition to our Roku which we use with Hulu Plus to catch up on the TV shows we don’t have time to watch when they are on (I’m a Castle addict). I try to keep up with new private channels and plugins periodically. I also have a Touchpad and downloaded a wonderful app for $2 called Video Flood HD to stream other shows I can’t get elsewhere, including HGTV. Not sure if something like it is available for other platforms, but it would be great if a similar app was available to integrate into Roku or Playon.
Yes, in theory, the higher the dB gain number the better. Although, overall performance is just as important. You must also consider where you live and where the broadcast towers are located. If they are over the visual horizon, a higher number is better. If not, a lower number is ok. You must watch out for high dB numbers that are marketing ploys to get you to pay more for a product you may not need.

Me and my fiance has got our very own first home together. We are trying to manage our bills and trying to find some way we can be able to get a lot of shows and full movies cheap. Looking to watch teen wolf shows, stuff like that then we also would like to have full christmas, scary, and more kind of movies. I dont know much about any of them so really looking for some good advice. Please let me know what kind would probably be the cheapest and best for us. Thanks!
There is also this thing called broadcast television, which anyone can watch as long as they have a TV that supports digital television (or a digital conversion box) and an over-the-air (OTA) HDTV antenna. The thing about broadcast television is that I couldn't watch it on Apple TV. I'd have to switch my TV input over, and then flip through the channels until I found something to watch. I rarely watched broadcast television because I tend to stick with Apple TV for my TV and movie watching activities.
That said, streams will be out there. Sites from other countries often aren’t subjected to rigorous copyright policing, and the sheer volume of live streaming can make it difficult for big providers like Facebook and Periscope to patrol. Chances are, if you dig around on the hashtags or sketchy subreddits, you’ll find someone pointing their camera phone at the game for your amusement.
The general rule for digital antennas is the higher, the better. Structures such as floors, cabinets, and walls may impact TV signal reception, so placing your antenna high in a window is ideal, as long as it's free from exterior obstructions (trees, buildings, billboards, and so on). Indoor antennas should not be installed behind a TV or electronic equipment, next to metal objects, or near high-traffic areas, as TV signal reception may be impacted.
If you’re old enough, the thought of using an antenna probably conjures memories of temperamental “rabbit ears” and staticky images. But today’s antennas come in a range of designs, from paper-thin indoor models like the Clearstream Flex, to Erector Set behemoths that you mount on a rooftop mast, and they provide reliable, crystal-clear HD resolution for absolutely free. All you need to do is plug one into the tuner that’s a fixture of most modern TVs.
If you’re old enough, the thought of using an antenna probably conjures memories of temperamental “rabbit ears” and staticky images. But today’s antennas come in a range of designs, from paper-thin indoor models like the Clearstream Flex, to Erector Set behemoths that you mount on a rooftop mast, and they provide reliable, crystal-clear HD resolution for absolutely free. All you need to do is plug one into the tuner that’s a fixture of most modern TVs.
Many rely on their cable provider for home phone service. Like most of their services, it can be replaced with a much cheaper internet based service. For those who need a little more than a cell phone after they ditch their cable TV subscription, I recommend PhonePower (formerly BroadVoice.) They are an affordable and reliable phone service provider that uses your existing internet connection.
If you have unpredictable tastes, but only focus on one show at a time, it might be most cost efficient to just buy all your television a la carte. For the price of a year of cable, the average viewer can buy 26 seasons of TV. Assuming these are all 45 minute shows with 14 episodes, that’s almost 300 hours of content. If you can’t ever imagine yourself watching more than that, then this plan is for you. Don’t forget to grab a TV antenna for major live events like the Oscars or the Super Bowl, or if you just want the option of kicking back and watching prime time now and then.
At first I used an antenna, Netflix, Hulu and other internet websites for alternatives to catch all of my favorite shows. Last summer something magical happened after the TV seasons ended, I stopped subscribing to Netflix, and I quit watching TV. Today I probably average about 1-2 hours per week of TV watching. I don’t miss it at all, and I am still really busy. So now, I’m not only saving money, but I am saving time. It really is a win-win situation when you cut TV out of your life.
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